GOLDEN WEST HOTEL EXHIBIT IS ONLINE


The Golden West Hotel was a vibrant place of employment and socializing for Portland’s African American community in the early 1900s. Display panels and audio narrative detailing this history can be found on the W.
Broadway side of the building
Click here  to download the Golden West Hotel Historic Display Panels–Electronic download the Golden West Hotel Historic Display Panels–Electronic Verisons with audio|includes JPG-PDF-MP3-DOCS files

“The original location of the Black community in Portland was in close proximity to Union Station where much of the Black economic life and employment life was centered.”
– Darrell Millner

“[My grandfather] saw there was this Black community that mainly worked for the railroad and there was no place for the Blacks to stay….In 1905 he purchased a building and in 1906 opened up the Golden West which was the largest Black-owned hotel west of the Mississippi.”
– Anthony I. Allen

This permanent exterior exhibit, installed in 2009, tells a social and ethnic story of the vibrant African-American community in Portland in the early 1900s and the successes and challenges of its residents. The exhibit – featuring six panels and a soundtrack– can be seen and heard by the public on both sides of the Golden West Building, 707 NW Everett at Broadway.

“ Theater Draws Color Line ”
W.D. Allen and his son Robert, (latter a Senior at Grant High School), attended a performance at the Orpheum Theater on Tuesday evening. On entering the usher told them to go upstairs. Mr. Allen then inquired if there were not seats downstairs. The usher said there were, but that Colored people were prohibited from occupying them. Mr. Allen and his son ignored the usher and took seats downstairs. Later, they were approached by the manager who is quoted as having said: “Gentlemen, I would like to see you out in the lobby.” Mr. Allen: “I don’t care to go out there, and I don’t care to be molested. I came to see the show.””
– Portland Advocate, October 5, 1929

Online Exhibit Celebrates the rich history of the Golden West, the former center of Portland’s African-American social and business life in the first decades of the twentieth century.

“Had The Biggest Gambling Estabishement On The West”

1906-1931

When Black entrepreneur W.D. Allen launched the Golden West Hotel in 1906, Portland was booming. The completion of the transcontinental railroad, the opening of Union Station and the Lewis and Clark Centennial Fair triggered a flood of visitors and workers to the city’s bustling North End. The Golden West was designed to serve the Black railway porters, cooks, barbers and waiters recruited by the major railroads. It provided “all the conveniences of home” for Black workers denied accommodation in Portland’s white owned hotels, and was a center of African American social life until the hotel’s closure in 1931.
 
Patrons could get a haircut and a shave at Waldo Bogle’s Barbershop, sweets at A.G. Green’s ice cream parlor and candy shop, and relax in George Moore’s Golden West Athletic Club featuring a Turkish bath and gymnasium. In its heyday, the Golden West provided an overnight home for prominent black entertainers, athletes, and civic leaders such as Illinois Congressman Oscar DePriest and labor organizer A. Philip Randolph. Some even “retired” there, including Portland Advocate newspaper founder and famous Portland Hotel “hat check man,” E.D. Cannady.
-Click-Map-Below-

The Golden West Hotel closed in 1931, a victim of the national economic Depression. The “New Golden West Hotel” opened in 1933 but closed in 1935. Other closures plagued the hotel until 1943, when it reopened as the Broadmoor Hotel, surviving until 1984 as low cost housing. Through the efforts of the building’s present owner, Central City Concern, and with the assistance of the Portland Development Commission, the building has been rehabilitated and the name restored to recognize the Golden West Hotel’s significant role in the history of Portland.

Cuarator: Graphic Design: Ildiko Toth, SERA Architects, Inc.
Historical Consultants: Cathy Galbraith, Architectural Heritage Center, Inc.
Dr. Darrell Millner, Distinguished Professor@Portland State University.
Advisory Committee Members: Nicole Allen, Billy Anfield, Will Bennett, Michael “Chappie” Grice,
Bill Hart
LOCAL COLOR IS NOW ONLINE
Will, In the future, please have anyone interested in getting copies of “Local Color” or in having a public showing of Local Color to contact me directly. We have a limited number of copies of the program and want to make sure they are distributed fairly.
Please email me with your request for copies including a description of who will get the copies and how they will be used.
Jeff Douglas Vice President of Local Production
JDouglas@opb.org Thank you | OPB-TV

LOCAL COLOR IS NOW ONLINE

Click here  to download the Golden West Hotel Historic Display Panels–Electronic download the Golden West Hotel Historic Display Panels–Electronic Verisons with audio|includes JPG-PDF-MP3-DOCS files

Will, In the future, please have anyone interested in getting copies of “Local Color” or in having a public showing of Local Color to contact me directly.  We have a limited number of copies of the program and want to make sure they are distributed fairly.
Please email me with your request for copies including a description of who will get the copies and how they will be used.
Jeff Douglas Vice President of Local Production
JDouglas@opb.org Thank you | OPB-TV
This 1991 OPB documentary chronicles the little known history of racism in Oregon and the moving story of people, both black and white, who worked for civil rights. Jon Tuttle was a news reporter in Portland for most of his life but said he was unaware of much of this history until late in his career. He set out to document the story but found he was almost too late as some of the important participants had died and others were getting on in age. Local Color is the story of black Oregonians and their struggle for equality told by the people, both black and white, who lived the history. But there are moments of highly disturbing racism in a state not known for racial diversity. But there are also moments of inspiration and courage as people take a stand to bring about important change. Without this historic documentary, many of these stories, from some of the state’s best people might have been lost and forgotten.
LOCAL COLOR IS NOW ONLINE
Will,
This would not have happened without your perseverance and dedication. The exhibit does a great job telling the story of the Golden West and the broader historical context of the African-American experience in Portland in the early 20th century.
Thanks. N.
¨  Nicholas T. Starin, City Planner
¨  Historic Resources Program & Central Portland Team
¨  Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability
¨  1900 SW 4th Avenue, Ste. 7100
¨  Portland OR 97201-5380
¨  nstarin@ci.portland.or.us
 Click here  to download the Golden West Hotel Historic Display Panels–Electronic download the Golden West Hotel Historic Display Panels–Electronic Verisons with audio|includes JPG-PDF-MP3-DOCS files

LOCAL COLOR IS NOW ONLINE

About willbe1960

Com-Unity
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to GOLDEN WEST HOTEL EXHIBIT IS ONLINE

  1. Pingback: Neighborhood Nuggets ~ What are you Missing? |

  2. Pingback: Perhaps the bumper sticker should say, “Keep Portland White” | Grammatical Apocalypse

  3. Pingback: can become a model for other communities to follow | golden west project:black in portland history

  4. Rose Marie says:

    I am curretnly studying hotel management and was excited tosee that there was a black hotel in Oregon. I would like to see that again.

  5. Mary-K Smith says:

    Was there a baseball team for The Golden West Hotel?

  6. Karen Wells says:

    Will,
    Have you heard that now’s there’s an “app” for African-American historical sites/locations? Here’s the link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/more-than-a-map/id497509679?mt=8
    I think the Golden West should be on it!! Best, Karen W.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s