Dick Bogle Leaves Us With…


Bogle Leaves Us With Some Portland Black History

Dick Bogle: A celebration of the Portland native’s life will be scheduled soon, Nola Bogle told the Willamette Week.

Dick Bogle: A celebration of the Portland native’s life will be scheduled soon, Nola Bogle told the Willamette Week.

Pdx Civil-Rights

The recent photo was taken by one of my students when she interviewed Mr. Bogle in the fall of 2008. He used this photo for his Facebook page and on his blogs and was very pleased with how it looked, so if you would like a high resolution version of this picture, please let me know.

Dick Bogle just passed away. We were able to interview him as part of the PDX Civil Rights Project in 2008 and his interview was truly outstanding. He will be greatly missed.
Photos:7

Sincerely,
Felicia Williams
PSU, PDX Civil Rights Project

Bogle died at Legacy Salmon Creek Hospital in Vancouver of congestive heart failure, said Nola Bogle, Dick Bogle’s wife of 33 years. She said a celebration of her husband’s life will be scheduled. He is survived by his son Richard “Buddy” Bogle; and daughters Richelle Lewellyn, Renita Byrd, Ericka Turay and Tiffany Peaks.

Here’s some of what WW had to say about Bogle in a 2007 mini-profile catching up with the former Portland city commissioner:

After Bogle lost re-election to Charlie Hales in 1992 by finishing third in a five-way primary, he left politics. The defeat freed him to pursue other loves, including jazz, journalism and photography.

For a time, he hosted a Paragon Cable show on Northeast Portland issues and took pictures of jazz musicians. Today, he’s a volunteer DJ on KMHD 89.1 FM, hosting a jazz program every other Monday from 10 am to 2 pm. He also writes a CD-review feature, “Dick’s Picks,” in The Skannerand a regular column in BOOM! Boomers&Beyond (formerly Lifestyles Northwest ), a Pamplin Media Group lifestyle magazine. And he’s the Oregon correspondent for Down Beat magazine, a monthly about jazz, blues and roots music.

This was not Bogle’s first foray into journalism. In 1968, after an eight-year stint as a Portland police officer, Bogle took a job with KATU-TV as Oregon’s first African-American television journalist. In 1984, two years after Bogle left TV to work as an aide to City Commissioner Mildred Schwab, the visibility he’d gained as a reporter and later as anchor helped him win a City Council seat. (His re-election campaign in 1992 was freighted by a couple of troubles: He reimbursed the city $20,000 for its settlement of a sexual harassment claim filed against him by a former aide, and $1,500 for unaccounted travel expenses.)

Bogle, a fifth-generation Oregonian, and his wife, Nola, moved two years ago to Vancouver, Wash.

Oregon’s black exclusion laws (which weren’t removed from the state Constitution until 1926) drove Bogle’s great-grandparents to move to Washington. Bogle says his more recent migration was driven by property taxes and cost of living.

Now he’s thinking about volunteering for the Portland Police Bureau to crack unsolved murder cases. “What,” Bogle quips, “could be a better retirement than playing jazz and solving murders?”

(~_~)

Source: jthomas@portlandobserver.com

Willamette Week has learned that Dick Bogle, the city’s second black city commissioner and first television news reporter, passed away this morning in Vancouver at the age of 79.

In the 1950s, Bogle joined the police force as a patrolman working in the detectives and intelligence divisions.

While a police officer, he worked part-time as a reporter and jazz critic for the now-defunct Portland Reporter.

In 1968, he turned in his badge when he was hired by Bruce Baer as a reporter for KATU-TV.

He later took a job as an aide to City Commissioner Mildred Schwab in 1982. He would go on to make his own bid for City Council to replace the retiring Charles Jordan, the first African American elected to City Council.

After running into some troubles after a former aide filed a sexual harassment claim against him, and allegations he didn’t account for all of his travel expenses emerged, he lost his bid for re-election.

In his later years, he returned to journalism while working part-time for the Police Bureau doing public affairs work on cold cases.

Bogle died at Legacy Salmon Creek Hospital in Vancouver of congestive heart failure, reports WW.

We’ll have a more extensive obituary in next week’s paper, and any information on celebrations of Bogle’s life.

(~_~)

A jazz historian, Bogle was a resident contributor to Down Beat magazine, volunteered at KMHD 89.1-FM jazz radio station in Portland, and maintained a Web site for his jazz reviews until last August, when his health began to fail, Nola Bogle said.

27318642_H11682817.JPG

View full size Tim Jewett/The OregonianFile photo: On December 31, 1992, City Commissioner Dick Bogle gives an official farewell to Portland Mayor Bud Clark.He continued to volunteer on a police cold case unit until he was sidelined by stenosis of the spine this fall, said his widow.

No funeral is planned, she said. But a celebration of her husband’s life is tentatively set for March. He is survived by his son Richard H. “Buddy” Bogle, of Mt. Vernon, Wash.; and four daughters Richelle Lewellyn, of Los Angeles, Calif., Renita Byrd, of Decatur, Ga., Ericka Turay, of Beaverton, and Tiffany Peaks, of Palmer, Ala.

— Kimberly A.C. Wilson

(~_~)

kgw.com

VANCOUVER, Wash. — A former Portland city commissioner and trailblazing journalist for the Pacific Northwest has died of heart complications at the age of 79.

Dick Bogle — newsman, police officer and twice-elected Portland commissioner — died from congestive heart failure at a Vancouver hospital. He was survived by his wife, Nola, a son and four daughters.

A celebration of the Portland native’s life will be scheduled soon, Nola Bogle told the Willamette Week.

After attending Oregon State and Portland State universities, Bogle began a career with the Portland Police Bureau, where he served for nine years, in the 1960s. News was a passion for Bogle, according to the public record of his life available across the Internet and from KATU-TV, where Bogle began work as a journalist after his time at the bureau.

According to KATU.com Bogle was the first black journalist in the Northwest when he was hired. The Willamette Week described him as the first black television news journalist and second black person elected to City Council.

Former City Commissioner and Jazz Columnist Dick Bogle Dies at 79

The Skanner’s longtime jazz columnist Dick Bogle has died. He was 79. He died Thursday morning at Legacy Salmon Creek Hospital of congestive heart failure according to his wife, Nola Bogle of 33 years.

Bogle led a diverse life beyond his love of jazz – which he spent in his later years as a reviewer of albums and on-air personality at KMHD 89.1 FM.
Bogle was also a politician, a police officer and a television news reporter. He was the second African American to serve on Portland’s city council, a police officer for the city for eight years and the first Black reporter for KATU News.
Until this fall, when a medical condition caused him to curtail his activities, he volunteered for the Portland Police Bureau’s Cold Case Homicide Unit, helping to solve some of the city’s older, unsolved murders.
Bogle served on Portland City Council from 1984 to 1992, when an electoral loss left him to pursue his other interests – mainly jazz and photography. In addition to providing The Skanner’s readers with thousands of reviews on the newest and best jazz recordings, he was the Oregon correspondent for Down Beat Magazine and other publications.
He was a member of a family that has a long history in Oregon. His descendents, Richard and America Bogle settled in the Walla Walla, Wa. area in the mid-1800s to sprout a line that would include a number of successful community and business leaders.
He is survived by his wife, Nola; son Richard H. ‘Buddy’ Bogle of Mt. Vernon, Wa.; four daughters, Richelle Lewellyn of Los Angeles, Renita Byrd of Decatur, Ga., Ericka Turay of Beaverton and Tiffany Peaks of Palmer, Ala.
According to reports in the Oregonian, there will be a celebration of life scheduled in March.
Access Dick Bogle’s jazz reviews at www.dickbogle.com.
He will be missed.

(~_~)

SEE MORE PHOTOS

Credit: KGW.com by Eric Adams

cop, newsman, politician, dead at 79

Dick Bogle: A celebration of the Portland native’s life will be scheduled soon, Nola Bogle told the Willamette Week.

(~_~)

VANCOUVER, Wash. — A former Portland city commissioner and trailblazing journalist for the Pacific Northwest has died of heart complications at the age of 79.

Dick Bogle — newsman, police officer and twice-elected Portland commissioner — died from congestive heart failure at a Vancouver hospital. He was survived by his wife, Nola, a son and four daughters.

A celebration of the Portland native’s life will be scheduled soon, Nola Bogle told the Willamette Week.

After attending Oregon State and Portland State universities, Bogle began a career with the Portland Police Bureau, where he served for nine years, in the 1960s. News was a passion for Bogle, according to the public record of his life available across the Internet and from KATU-TV, where Bogle began work as a journalist after his time at the bureau.

According to KATU.com Bogle was the first black journalist in the Northwest when he was hired. The Willamette Week described him as the first black television news journalist and second black person elected to City Council.

After 15 years of reporting on Portland, Bogle left the news desk but didn’t stray far from the camera. He was elected to City Hall in 1984 and even entertained a run for the mayor’s office, according to archived newsreels here at KGW Newschannel 8.

News-8 Archives: Bogle on being Mayor of Portland’

Bogle lost re-election in 1992 after two terms and retreated toward his passions — jazz, photography and policework.

Bogle enjoyed writing about jazz later in life. He kept a blog on jazz history and was a volunteer disc jockey at KMHD 89.1-FM. Bogle’s affection for news carried into his retirement – he wrote a jazz history column for Portland’s newspaper, The Skanner and was an accomplished photographer. An archive of his work may be accessed at his personal website, www.dickbogle.com.

Bogle also stayed active with the Police Bureau and continued work with the Cold Case Squad long after retiring from public life.

Despite a long, accomplished career serving the Rose City, Bogle moved to Vancouver later in life, where his wife now resides.

(~_~)

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3 Responses to Dick Bogle Leaves Us With…

  1. Clarence Harper Jr. says:

    Dick Bogle did a lot more then there is space to list his accomplishments. He was a role model, mentor and good friend. He as well as his family have blazed many trails for all Afro-Americans living in the City of Portland.

  2. Greetings Nola. I tried to call you just after Dick passed but I was unable to reach you and I dont think I left a message. Yes my heart was broken, And I wish I could have been there to play for the memorial. My heartfelt prayers go out to you and the rest of the family. Take care and may God be with you. I will miss Dick greatly and I know he is in a better place now. Peace, and love.. dennis

  3. Dinah Kinney says:

    Hi Nola,
    I don’t know you, and you’ve never met me. I’m sorry for your loss, your husband sounds like an amazing man. My Great, Great Grandfather, Obed Dickinson, was the minister for the marriage of America and Richard Bogle, your husband’s Great or Great Great Grandparents. Obed and his wife Charlotte, hosted the reception in their home. Newspapers as far away as San Francisco reported on the scandal. My father died last year and my sisters and I have inherited several lovely and historic items. We are looking for a museum home for the Dickinson’s beautiful coverlet, and thought the Oregon Historical Society should have it, but considering the Dickinsons’ life work, it may be more appropriate in a muli-cultural museum. Any suggestions? We’d love to meet you.
    Dinah Kinney
    Seattle Washington
    206 387-0268

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