take-note oct2009

History exhibit recalls black business district

Community Practionors & Friends =

Hope to see you soon…

Please Forward…

(there’s 1440 on this E-List)

We are excited to announce that two of the lead actors from the

Portland Center Stage production of "Ragtime" will perform a song at the

event.

jump’n on da bandwagon

Golden West Hotel

Central City Concern Unveils Golden West Building African-American History Exhibit – October 22nd The celebration will be free and open to the public, from 5:00 – 6:30 pm@Carleton Hart Architects, 322 NW 8th Avenue.

Photos“Golden West Hotel Historic Display Project Advisory Committee

The Golden West Hotel was at the center of Portland’s first African-American neighborhood early in the twentieth century. Due to its proximity to Union Station it served African American railroad workers denied lodging in other Portland hotels.

links:

Most Racist City

A little more light on little-known history

Amateur Historian Pushes Behind the Scenes History

Black History Film “Local Color” Rereleased

http://kboo.fm/node/16905

Will Bennett

Golden West Project

503.491.9749

GOLDEN-WEST-PROJECT@AFRICAN-AMERICAN-HISTORICAL-DISTRICT.COM

peace

will b.

(will real nice)

Will,

In the future, please have anyone interested in getting copies of Local Color or in having a public showing of Local Color to contact me directly.  We have a limited number of copies of the program and want to make sure they are distributed fairly.

Please email me with your request for copies including a description of who will get the copies and how they will be used.

Thank you.

Jeff Douglas
Vice President of Local Production
OPB-TV

JDouglas@opb.org

This 1991 OPB documentary chronicles the little known history of racism in Oregon and the moving story of people, both black and white, who worked for civil rights. Jon Tuttle was a news reporter in Portland for most of his life but said he was unaware of much of this history until late in his career. He set out to document the story but found he was almost too late as some of the important participants had died and others were getting on in age. Local Color is the story of black Oregonians and their struggle for equality told by the people, both black and white, who lived the history. But there are moments of highly disturbing racism in a state not known for racial diversity. But there are also moments of inspiration and courage as people take a stand to bring about important change. Without this historic documentary, many of these stories, from some of the state's best people might have been lost and forgotten.

This 1991 OPB documentary chronicles the little known history of racism in Oregon and the moving story of people, both black and white, who worked for civil rights. Jon Tuttle was a news reporter in Portland for most of his life but said he was unaware of much of this history until late in his career. He set out to document the story but found he was almost too late as some of the important participants had died and others were getting on in age. Local Color is the story of black Oregonians and their struggle for equality told by the people, both black and white, who lived the history. But there are moments of highly disturbing racism in a state not known for racial diversity. But there are also moments of inspiration and courage as people take a stand to bring about important change. Without this historic documentary, many of these stories, from some of the state’s best people might have been lost and forgotten.

Background: As you know, the Golden West building is one of the oldest remaining landmarks of African American history inPortland.  Central City Concern purchased and renovated the building in 1989, and recently took full ownership.  For the past 19 years, the Golden West has served countless homeless and mentally ill people. In 2007 CCC undertook a number of renovations to the building.  We earmarked $4000 to restore the historic display that faces Everett Street sidewalks.  When the City of Portland Visions in Action grant program became known, CCC contacted Old Town History Project Director Dr. Jackie Peterson who helped us put together an application.  CCC was awarded $9250 from the City and $1000 from the Oregon Council on the Humanities. The combined funds, plus in-kind labor contributions primarily by CCC, will allow us to restore and improve the exhibit panels and to also add two new display windows on the Broadway side of the building and a sound component. The major goal is to convey the vibrancy of the African American neighborhood around the Golden West in the early part of the 20th century.

Namaste!

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